Private Day Tour in Tenerife – from the South to the North of the the is…

 
 
 
 

Book VIP Private tour in Tenerife at: http://www.TenerifeHost.com

 
 

This tour started in Los Gigantes after 2 hour Jet Ski tour along the highest cliffs in Atlantic Ocean. Then we drove by the road which also called a “backbone of the island” through National Park Teide, La Esperanza, La Laguna, Las Mercedes to the most nothern island’s village Chamroga hidden in the jungle of Anaga Mountains. And then, from Chamroga we took a quite hard 2 hours walk to the most northern point of Tenerife – Faro de Anaga (lighthouse of Anaga). This is just an example private excursion, where you can combine different activities depend on your physic condition.

Advertisements
Private Day Tour in Tenerife – from the South to the North of the the is…

Rumours, traditions, fiestas, sport and that bus station again!

Rumours of recent changes to the law abound, yet the town council has been quick to state that they were not going to ban swimming in the fishing harbour, at least, not yet, I suspect. There would be a public outcry; people have always swum there, it is an age old tradition. Quite why, I struggle to understand, it is far from the cleanest stretch of water especially when the local fishermen jettison fish guts and entrails straight into it, but perhaps that simply adds to the authenticity of the whole experience. Still I am hardly qualified to comment, having just learned to swim at the ripe old age of fifty plus, I stick to the relative safety of swimming pools, my only forays into salt water to date being the ripple free calm of Las Teresitas. Perhaps that’s the reason it is so popular, the harbour walls provide protection from the Atlantic tides. And it is popular, becoming more so. Where once it was the preserve predominantly of local people, now its appeal has widened and more tourists can be seen taking the plunge. I do see the appeal of swimming in sea water and with the town’s beaches more often than not flying red flags, there is the little alternative, apart from the saltwater pools of Lago Martiánez, I guess, but to swim there comes at a cost, so not for those who holiday on a budget. Local tradition aside, isn’t it is ridiculous that people are allowed to swim in what is a working port. Boats are coming in and out at all times of the day; it really is an accident waiting to happen, and a costly one I suspect. There, we have got to the crux of the problem and the local council should take heed. Unfortunately we now live in a claim culture society and there are plenty of no win, no fee companies, even in slightly behind the times Tenerife, happy to fight your case. There are no warning signs, there are no roped off, boat free, areas, there are no Socorristas (lifeguards, not football fans as I once thought). Is the town council leaving itself wide open to a claim? Fiesta month July was billed as a month of fiestas, so what exactly did we get. Carmen, of course, it is without doubt a spectacular event and one with an almost unique atmosphere, but why do they get so emotional. I put it down to cultural differences. We Brits, given the same scenario, would, I’m sure adopt the stiff upper lip resolve. There will be no tears in public, it is simply not the done thing, old boy, but then again perhaps that’s only me. Another beauty pageant, this one to choose a Puerto Princess just for the month’s festivities (I nearly wrote to find ‘Miss July’, but that gives the wrong impression, more calendar girl or centrefold than beauty queen). San Telmo Sardine Night, a popular event, one which for the second year running had to be held in Plaza Europa. Yes, the works at San Telmo are still ongoing, but, as I have said before, they are nearly finished and one day I am sure they will be! Baile de Magos, a traditional event, a night of dance, not quite a black tie and gown sort of event, but local national costume was obligatory, oh, and you had to take your own food. There was a three day Artisan Fair, the usual sort of thing, this one was organised by El Cabildo and to be honest was nothing to write home about, too few stalls, and far too close together. There have been, in my opinion, far better fairs recently in the neighbouring towns. Sport played a significant part in the festivities. Xtreme Challenge, a gruelling 10km race, run over rough terrain combined with twice over a very challenging obstacle course, with a fair bit of mud and water thrown in for good measure. It was a fun event, very enjoyable, especially for the spectators. Beach volleyball at Punta Brava, there has been two tournaments within the month. Road races through the streets of Puerto, a 5km, twice around a town centre route and a 10km over the same route, both well attended. Oh, I nearly forgot, though it is hardly qualifies as a sport, but there was also the Domino Tournament, a very intense affair, fiercely competitive and strongly contested. I am told there was also a cycling event and a beach football tournament, both of which, I have to say, I have no details of because I missed them, wasn’t even aware that they were on, didn’t see them advertised , which is sadly the case, more often than not, for many events that are staged in Puerto. Sport is not just about the winning, but about the taking part, which has been plain to see, and our new mayor is no slouch either, having taken part in the volleyball ,the 5km race and the beach football, apparently. El Tren Not Puerto specific, but one which affects the whole of the island, El Tren has featured in the news again recently and this time with a new twist for those of us in the North. It is now being suggested that as the works would create such an upheaval the TF5 should be widened at the same time. […]

Rumours, traditions, fiestas, sport and that bus station again!

The sky at night: Tenerife boosts its appeal as star-gazing venue

Tenerife has boosted its position as one of the best locations on the planet for stargazing, with the introduction of eight new telescopes at the world-famous Teide Observatory. The new telescopes will appeal to “astro-tourists” and scientists looking to unravel the mysteries of the universe. The new, advanced solar telescopes mark the 30th anniversary of the foundation of the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC). Of the eight introduced, six are robotic telescopes from countries including the USA, Russia, Qatar and Slovakia; and two belong to the QUIJOTE (Q-U-I-Joint Tenerife), a scientific experiment involving multiple partners from Spain and the UK. The recently-launched Volcano Life Experience operates guided tours several days a week to the Teide Observatory, which is also home to GREGOR, the largest solar telescope in Europe. Located at 2,390 metres above sea level and next to Mount Teide – Spain’s highest peak at 3,718 metres – Teide Observatory is perfect for studying stars at night due to its geographical location, low-light pollution and extremely clear night skies, which are protected by laws relating to contamination levels and flight paths. The Observatory rests above the clouds in the volcanic Teide National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, globally recognised as a ‘Starlight Tourist Destination’ by the Starlight Foundation. Tenerife offers a huge choice of ‘star tourism’ experiences for visitors to enjoy on their island getaway. Those with an interest in outer space can learn about the important astrophysics research carried out by the IAC at Teide Observatory by joining a guided tour to see the stars and marvel at dazzling displays. Visitors also have the opportunity to enjoy a free “open day” at the Observatory every summer, with many activities available for children. They can also tour the Planetarium at the Museum of Science and the Cosmos in La Laguna or stay overnight in a rural cottage or country hotel complete with a telescope for a private observation of the stars. Mount Teide’s cable car also offers a very special ‘Sunset and Stars’ stargazing trip, with a dusk-time dinner served at 2,000 metres above sea level. The Canary Islands, specifically Tenerife and La Palma, have the privilege of being among the few locations in the world that will install new telescopes of the future. The island of Tenerife also leads the EUSky Route, a pioneering project funded by the European Commission which aims to create “astrotourism” routes in the participating European countries, including Poland, Italy, Portugal, Bulgaria, Greece and Spain. Next year, Tenerife will welcome stars of a different kind, such as Stephen Hawking and astrophysicist-musician Brian May, when it hosts the Starmus Festival – a unique celebration of science, art and music – from 27th June to 2nd July 2016. This special event is the brainchild of Dr. Garik Israelian of the IAC. Carlos Alonso, President of the Tenerife Island Government, comments: “We are delighted to welcome eight new telescopes at Teide Observatory. Astronomy remains of great importance to Tenerife and we hope these new telescopes will encourage even more tourists and scientists to visit our island.” For more information on stargazing in Tenerife, please visit http://www.webtenerife.co.uk/activities/sports/other-sports/observacion+de+estrellas.htm (available in a variety of languages, including English).

The sky at night: Tenerife boosts its appeal as star-gazing venue